Friday, January 11, 2019

And the Winner Is...


#118, #118, #118!!!

I am always fascinated that people share my fascinations. I thank everybody for reading and responding. I'll do this again in the future. I hope to hold your attention. Thank you.


#118 had 5 shots inside. There were a few others that had 4.


Now, to go pick up a customs form because this plane is going to the Netherlands...

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Rabbet Raffle Round 1 Results

Who will win this X-out Rabbet plane?


The selection committee has spoken!




The lucky many (50) who will enter the final round are listed below.


Check to see if your number advanced and stay tuned...

You can see my previous post to find out which number was assigned to you.

Saturday, January 5, 2019

Raffle to Win a Rabbet Plane

The entry period to win a rabbet plane is closed. I appreciate all readers who entered and even those hundreds of you who didn't (read far enough here or here).

Here are the rules:
My son will randomly choose the lucky few/several/many to make it to round 2 with The Randomizer. He will shoot one round of shot at the target below. Anybody who has any portion of their circle pierced will make it to the final round to be held a few days after the first. One round nicking a circle equals 3 in the center. I am the final arbiter regarding any issues, but there won't be any.

The numbers have been distributed in the order in which you responded to my request. The first person to send an email is #1, the last person is #173.

You may find your number in the following images. The list is alphabetical based upon the email address with which you responded. I put a lot of asterisks over a large part of each person's address to keep this anonymous. Please let me know if you have any questions, but let's keep these minimal and double check your number against your known address.






Unfortunately, it's raining today and I don't want to deal with running ink. We will have The Randomizer choose the winner ASAP. Tomorrow looks like it will be the day. I will post the full video upon completion immediately on my Instagram account: @msbickford. I'll later post the names/numbers of those who made it to round 2, along with the full video, here.

Again, there are 2 rounds this year which is different than the one of last. (I have fun with the contest and want to prolong it. I thank you each for humoring me.) 

Saturday, December 29, 2018

Approaching the Limits of My Pay-Grade: Roman Vs. Grecian Profiles

The pursuit of my woodworking hobby has generally consisted of seeing a piece of furniture and wondering a) if I could build it and b) what it will look like once I do. Basically, my house is filling with self-indulgent endeavors that are totally unrelated to my family's needs (think wife).

These pursuits are actually how I was originally attracted to hollows and rounds. With hollows and rounds I am limited by my skill but not by what bits I have in my drawers or Freud has in their catalogues. (i.e. I've started a new project and the very last thing I'll consider are the intricately specific profiles. I know I can make them, it's just not a concern.)

I put up a post on my blog yesterday regarding a custom moulding plane I was commissioned to make. This profile is a "Grecian" profile vs. a "Roman."


 Roman ogee on the Left, Grecian on the Right 


Sometimes I wish I wanted to learn about the reigning empires, major players, and world affecting events of the period that may have led to the evolution that greatly affected my Wednesday of this past week. In fact, maybe the proper thing to do is go read about the subject for a few hours, make broad statements that I cannot cite, and then hope a few specific people won't read my blog. This will then certainly dazzle you with my Wikipedian-like "knowledge," right? Well, I won't.

I'll just quickly make a broad generalization about the the difference between Roman and Grecian profiles that may define a few terms I reference on occasion: Roman profiles are made out of circle segments and Grecian profiles are made out of elliptical segments.

Again, Roman on the Left, Grecian on the Right


Hollows and rounds allow me to copy both. I know I can make the plane I was commissioned to make. Additionally, I can make the profiles I may want to make in the future: circular vs. elliptical, Grecian vs. Roman, and William & Mary vs. Chippendale vs. Becksvoortian (AKA Shaker, AKA no moulding planes).


Note 1: I know and care more than may let on here.

Note 2: Please send a single email to matt@msbickford.com with the subject of "Raffle" to enter to win an 'X-out' 7/8" rabbet plane. I did a contest like this last year. I go out of my way to keep the winner to being a reader. If the contest gets posted on Instagram, Twitter, Tinder, etc. then I'm going to cancel or postpone it. I don't want the publicity, likes or follows. (You don't even have to sign up for my mailing list, nor will you be put on it.) Don't decrease your chances of winning! Like last year, the contest winner will be chosen randomly in an ultra-transparent manner. This won't be me giving the plane to the person with the highest Iprofile. Like last year, I will ship this plane anywhere that USPS will deliver, their rules/relationships not mine. US and Canada? Sure. Germany and Australia? Definitely. The Congo? Probably not, I don't know. But you're probably fine to enter. The specific rules will be defined once the entry period is over. I am the final arbiter. Entries must be made before 23:59 EST on 1/4/19. The plane will work perfectly, I just don't like the piece of wood. If you win and you've already purchased a rabbet plane directly from me then I'll find something else for you.

Thursday, December 27, 2018

Creating Custom Moulding Planes

I constantly disappoint two groups of woodworkers, one of which is the 'hand-tool only' crowd.

Many people assume that I must be part of this wild group due to my making of moulding planes for a living. These crazies (said with affection) are often shocked and disappointed when they find out that I am not entirely one of them. I have a router and I like my router. (Fun Fact 1: my router was the first thing I ordered off of Amazon 15 years ago. I paid $279 + shipping in '03 and I could now get the same kit for $263 with shipping included.) 

If I need to thickness a board less than 12" then I'm headed to my planer 10 out of 10 times. However, with hand planes I can thickness a face that is more than 12" and, on those rare occasions, even more than 30". Bench planes offer me the ability to flatten and thickness any width, not limited by fences, etc. (Fun Fact 2: my planer was part of my second order from Amazon way back then. I paid $449 and the same model is currently $599.) 

(Fun Fact 3: you don't care about my Amazon history, so I'll stop.)

Hand tools afford me this desirable idea of infinity: whether flat surfaces done with planes vs. machines, dovetails done by hand vs. jig,  even the tenons upon a curved surface to adjoin with a crest rail of a Queen Anne chair. 


INFINITY!

Hollows and rounds offer me the same infinite number of possibilities with moulding profiles as many hand tools do with other aspects of this craft. With my selection of hollows and rounds I can essentially make any moulding profile that happens along a straight length. 



On occasion, I am requested to make custom, dedicated planes. In these instances I will need to manufacture 10" of a single profile that will be the sole. I will need to make this short moulding only one time. 



I am still able to make these single planes for nearly the same price because I already have the proper tooling to make an infinite number of profiles: Hollows & Rounds. 

(Metric measurements not included, but I can get close.)

Hollows and rounds fit perfectly into my workshop because I make small amounts of profiles that are determined by you, my customers. In my shop I use hollows and rounds to make the soles of custom planes, remove machine marks from standard planes, and to create the seemingly rare project (see above)

Hollows and rounds will allow you to comfortably make small amounts of highly specific profiles quickly and efficiently, whether it's for 10" of an exacting plane, a piece of reproduction furniture, or something entirely your own.

(The elliptical segments of this plane's sole was executed with four profiled planes #2 Hollow/Round and #3 Hollow/Round, neither of which are recommended for a first-timer)



Talking about (intentionally) softened corners, Chuck Bender wrote a fascinating blog regarding extremely sharp details on his blog the other day. Check it out. 

disclaimer: Chuck is one of the three people responsible for getting me into this professional pursuit. I will be teaching at Chuck's mid-2019. I have a working relationship with him, but not Amazon.


Please send an email to matt@msbickford.com with the subject of "Raffle" to enter to win an X-out 7/8" rabbet plane. I did a contest like this last year. I go out of my way to keep the winner to being a reader. If the contest gets posted on Instagram, Twitter, Tinder, etc. then I'm going to cancel or postpone it. I don't want the publicity, likes or follows. (You don't even have to sign up for my mailing list, nor will you be put on it.) Don't decrease your chances of winning! Like last year, the contest winner will be chosen randomly in an ultra-transparent manner. This won't be me giving the plane to the person with the highest Iprofile. Like last year, I will ship this plane anywhere that USPS will deliver, their rules/relationships not mine. US and Canada? Sure. Germany and Australia? Definitely. The Congo? Probably not, I don't know. But you're probably fine to enter. The specific rules will be defined once the entry period is over. I am the final arbiter. Entries must be made before 23:59 EST on 1/4/19. The plane will work perfectly, I just don't like the piece of wood. If you win and you've already purchased a rabbet plane directly from me then I'll find something else for you.

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Tuning a Rabbet Plane

All planes eventually go out of flat, both wood and metal.

Metal planes take a long time to distort and also take a long time to fix. Wooden planes go out of flat seasonally and are a one-minute fix.

In this post we will address tuning a wooden rabbet plane.


How do you know when a plane's sole is no longer adequately flat?

The first sign of a plane's sole no longer being flat will proceed in this manner: You set the plane to take a predictable shaving, but it does not. You then blame yourself and your inadequacies, only to set the plane to take a slightly more aggressive shaving. Then the plane only removes wood from the first and last 1/2 inch while still underperforming your expectations. You continue with this process, constantly setting it more aggressively and still being unimpressed with the not performing plane...

Eventually, you again set the plane to take a slightly more aggressive pass and your plane is taking a heavy, aggressive, and uncontrollable shaving throughout.

At this point you know that your expectations were originally correct and your plane's sole needs to be addressed.

How do you address the sole? Do not fear, wooden planes are easy:



Now throw some wax onto the sole and get back to work!

(Anybody that has a boxed rabbet plane shall spin the plane around and start working back to front once taking shavings in front of the mouth, otherwise you will be working against short grain and will chip out the mouth.)

Note: I will be posting instructions to win an 'X-out' plane in the coming day(s)/week(s). I go out of my way to keep the winner as being a current blog reader and 'in-house.' If you've made it this far into the text then I'll encourage you to keep reading my upcoming blogs, knowing that any publicity you give this future contest will ultimately reduce your chances of winning and my desire to pay my readers with these contests.  I am, intentionally, not striving to increase my social media exposure. So, let us keep this quiet, or I will cancel the upcoming contest.


Saturday, December 15, 2018

Making Another Picture Frame with Hollows and Rounds (Actually, Just Hollows Here)

I will choose to keep this post quick because time is precious at this point of each year. Christmas presents must be made, after all. (This frame was made several years ago.)


This frame starts with material that is 1 3/16" wide





Like every profile made with hollows and rounds, we will start with a series of rabbets...



...and chamfers to remove waste and guide the profiled planes.



Step 3: #6 Hollow to make a full 180 degrees of an arc.



Step 5: #4 Hollow



Step 5 and 6: #2 Hollow



Finally, squash the top profile in Step 7: #10 Hollow



Picture frame profiles often look strange to us furniture people, but...



...they always come together once mitered, however.






For the record, I spent 00:20:10 with the profiled planes here, much of which was battling my previous workbench, Big Pink. I had it on videotape but couldn't bring myself to post it.

Note: I will be posting instructions to win an 'X-out' plane in the coming day(s)/week(s). I go out of my way to keep the winner as being a current blog reader, in-house. If you've made it this far into the text then I'll encourage you to keep reading my upcoming blogs, knowing that any publicity you give this future contest will ultimately reduce your chances of winning and my desire to pay my readers.  I am, intentionally, not striving to increase my social media exposure. So, let us keep this quiet, or I will cancel the upcoming contest.