Sunday, January 9, 2011

A weekend with Hollows, Rounds, and Hand Tools of All Sorts

I hosted a bench at Lie-Nielsen's Hand Tool Event at 3rd Ward in Brooklyn this past weekend. It seemed to be extremely well attended by a wide range of woodworkers, artisans, and other people who just wanted to get their hands on the new No. 51.


Lie-Nielsen above and me below.



We made coves and ovolos...

Ogees and reverse ogees...

Circles and ovals with one fillet or two...

 I failed publicly on a profile I've done 100 times...

And succeeded with one I've never done.

If 15 people tried cutting a rabbet for the first time with only a rabbet plane, I will conservatively estimate that 100% of them got it right. I did well less than half of what you see above and what didn't get pictured.

Rabbet followed by #4 round
Rabbet then snipes bill (Let the record show I would consider doing this step differently next time. I actually had to flip between the two snipes bills trying to get clearance for the next step.)
Rabbet followed by #6 hollow
#10 hollow followed by #2 hollow

 Homework: how do you make this 1/4" bead in the center of a board?


There were more shavings on the floor Friday than I remember at any other event I've been to. Those in attendance certainly tried all of the tools available.


13 comments:

  1. Matt,
    Really like the blog, its full of info and has got me motivated to make some hollow and rounds.

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  2. For the bead I would start by marking out two lines defining the bead. Take a rabbit or snipes bill and deepen the lines on each side forming the pyramid for the bead. Follow this with a #4 hollow.

    How was the #51?

    Jim

    ReplyDelete
  3. Matt, got a question. On your illustrations of the rabbets that you cut before using the H&Rs, do the colors indicate the order in which they are cut?

    Thanks,

    Ken

    ReplyDelete
  4. Let's say going forward the red one will always be first. The order will be different if you're using a fenced plane like a moving fillister.

    The colors haven't designated order, but they have designated the cut dimension. (i.e. the orange rabbet doesn't extend to the edge so you know it's not first.)

    The red one needs to be cut first in this situation if you're using a 7/8" rabbet like I am. After that it doesn't matter.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Jim,

    The No. 51 is pretty sweet. I had high expectations and they were met. The grip angle is perfect.

    I used two snipes bills the way you described for the bead.

    Matt

    ReplyDelete
  6. Matt, Thanks for the blog. Lots of interesting stuff to learn. One quick question though relating to forming the bead in the middle of the board. In my house I have 10" wide baseboards that have a double bead going down the middle. I have been struggling with how to reproduce this moulding for quite awhile to patch some areas. I assume that a double bead would be the same procedure? Just twice as much? If so could you expand on the procedure? You may have just made a sale.

    Thanks,
    Also a Matt

    ReplyDelete
  7. Your blog is very informative! I am beginning to understand the principles and looking forward to making moldings. It looks like all of your examples of the profiles are for furniture. How would you make larger profiles for architectural molding? Some of the ones I’ve seen are quite large and seem larger than biggest hollow or round available?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Village idiot,
    Please send an example.
    Matt

    ReplyDelete
  9. Matt,
    Two beads right next to each other with no flat between, right? I will post something tonight.
    Also a Matt

    ReplyDelete
  10. Truly wanted to make it, but didn't want to drive 100 miles in the snow. Do it again soon.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Correct, no flat in between. I looked at the snipes bill planes you make and the radii of the planes seems much larger than the radius of the bead, so I don't quite get that part. Looking forward to your post.

    The other Matt

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Matt,
    I had a great time at the event- thanks for making the trip to out brooklyn and demonstrating your wonderful planes!
    Cheers,
    Niels

    ReplyDelete
  13. So using the six hollow then the ten hollow to get a non circle curve right? How do you avoid planes tracks from the two planes?

    When I have jumped from two planes I am getting the darn plane tracks from the corners.

    best
    John

    ReplyDelete