Sunday, January 6, 2013

Homeschooling 101: A Day at the Sawmill

While children were getting on the bus to return to school and adults were heading back to the office on Wednesday, Sheldon and I headed up to Stow, MA to mill a log my friend had been eyeing on his property. Fortunately, he also has a woodmizer, a metal detector and a willingness to spin a single log a few dozen times to quartersaw wood by my definition, which isn't quite as stringent as Sheldon's.

Here is a picture that is representative of the quality of milling for every single piece that made it into the back of the truck.


And for the record, the entire log made it into the back of the truck. 10.5' long, 32" at the widest end and 26" at the other.

The wood is standing on end for the next few days while I pick out a color for the latex paint. Then the wait begins.

10 comments:

  1. Hi Matt,
    Looks like nice beech. You may want to be careful about the legality of transporting non-kiln dried wood across state lines. Some laws exist to slow the spread of non-native invasive insects.

    Steve

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  2. Matt,

    You're not already decided on pink latex paint?

    Chris

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  3. Do you actually homeschool your kids, as the title implies?

    I'm jealous of Sheldon: I would love to be a part of milling lumber like this.

    If it is beech, will this be made into moulding planes?

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  4. MWH,

    My wife and I homeschool our children, yes.

    This is a beech log and it will eventually be used for moulding planes if all goes according to plan.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Picking a color of paint for end sealer is a topic that no one ever discusses. It is a big decision since you will be living with this wood for several years as it dries. I sense your next article for Popular Woodworking!

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  6. I am with Chris on this - Pink latex for sure.

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  7. Great information on Sawmill and woodworking! Your blog feature much of the same content that I have come to expect here.

    Portable Sawmill

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  8. Too bad all that pith will have to go to waste. Never seems to dry right.

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  9. Thanks for your message. Have you read lots of picture books? It's an excellent way to get a really good feel for what works. And it's worth checking out the recent ones (so you could go into a bookshop and read through lots of them -very carefully of course!). And if you buy some that you think are great, or get some really good ones out of the library, try typing them out and looking at them as manuscripts so you can see where the page turns happen and the shape of the story. That can really help give you a feel for it. I would really recommend joining SCBWI and there are all sorts of events where you can learn from other authors and editors and agents. We've got critique groups which can be extremely valuable in helping you make your story the very best it can be. My latest post is all about feedback on your writing, which might help (click on my name on the right hand side of the blog and it'll come up). And don't worry about your story not coming out perfect first time round: it often takes lots and lots of editing to get it right.
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    Simran Kaur

    ReplyDelete